10 Ways Drones Are Changing Your World

10 Ways Drones Are Changing Your World

“If you want a moment to look epic,” Parker Gyokeres says, “hire a drone.” As a photographer in the Air Force, he once built a drone from scratch, outfitting it with a GoPro camera, because he could not persuade anyone to take him up in a helicopter. Today he owns a fleet of autonomous aircraft in New York that he uses to shoot projects as ­varied as BMW commercials, corporate events, and weddings (including the nuptials of U.S. Rep. Sean Patrick Maloney, D-N.Y.).

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Drones, UAVs, sUAS, Commercial, Hobbyist, 333 Exemption, Far 107, Registration: What Does It All Mean??

Operations of unmanned aircraft have existed since before manned aviation took flight and dominated the National Airspace System (NAS). Historically, most of these operations have existed in the hobbyist realm with a smaller percentage performing commercial missions. Recent advancements in technology have rapidly moved unmanned aviation from a relatively quiet hobby, into the mainstream with significant growth in commercial applications at a pace not seen before in history. As technology has spurred this growth, the FAA has moved to balance interests of multiple stakeholders while maintaining the safest aviation airspace in the world.

This class will help you understand the current UAV environment from a regulatory and practical perspective. 

We’ll discuss the evolution of regulations over the last few years, the new proposed Federal Aviation Regulations Part 107, registration, practical applications, and how Public (Government), Civil (Commercial), and Hobbyist UAV activities function in the NAS today. 

 

B&H supports the drone market with everything needed to support the professional and hobbyist. Click here to view the our special webiste devoted to UAV and drones. 

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The Intersection Of Drones, Photos And Art - Buzzfeed Live features Propellerheads

http://live.huffingtonpost.com/r/segment/drones-and-the-future-of-photography/558c621e2b8c2a5a2c00040e

 

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Parker Gyokeres

In addition to being the owner, vehicle builder and pilot at Propellerheads, Parker Gyokeres is an active duty U.S. Air Force Photojournalist and the current Chief of Public Affairs for the 621st Contingency Response Wing, Joint Base Mcguire-Dix-Lakehurst, N.J. Gyokeres has 22 years of worldwide expeditionary experience, to include three deployments to Afghanistan and one to Iraq. He has been active in remote control flight for ten years and has extensive experience with the construction and operation of both multicopters and fixed-wing aircraft.

Time Warner Cable News Profiles Propellerheads

MIDDLETOWN, N.Y. -- Parker Gyokeres of Propellerheads Aerial Photography in Middletown says he bought his first aircraft 3 years ago. Now, he not only takes beautiful aerial shots for clients, but he builds them as well.

"The radio has to talk to the flight controller, it has to talk to camera controller , the camera has to be triggered, everything has to work together," he said.

So far, he's built 18 medium-sized aircraft for about $10,000 apiece. He has a 3D printing machine that'll help him build parts he can't buy. Gyokeres says it takes about a month to assemble the drone.

"Make sure when you plug it in everything comes to life and you sit sit there like Dr. Frankenstein - it's alive!"

Parker has built drones that weigh as little as one pound to one that's 25 pounds. All can bring a photographer and his camera to a height they couldn't reach before.

When it comes to events, Gyokers says he does about 3 a week. He has two other employees that work with him: one who will navigate the drone while the other will control the camera.

"Now, we can get down right on a job right under treetop level, down in a riverbank, places you couldn't take a manned helicopter at a fraction of the cost with no time at all."

Gyokeres hopes to expand and give clients images and experiences he says only drones can provide.

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Business Insider covers Propellerheads for "Game Changers" series

Business Insider covers Propellerheads for "Game Changers" series

The film and video industry will never look the same, thanks to drones. Commercial use of drones is now prohibited, but there are signs that regulatory changes may be coming soon. The FAA has just granted exemptions to six filmmaking companies to use drones equipped with cameras.

Drone videos are already changing the way we see things.

"I think that drones are the most amazing innovation that cinema has seen since probably the Steadicam," director and photographer Randy Scott Slavin tells Business Insider.

While many people look at drones as a loud and expensive hobby, professional filmmakers like Slavin are using their drones to capture video from a unique perspective. After his aerial footage of New York City went viral, Slavin was inspired to launch the New York City Drone Film Festival, to celebrate the stunning works of countless other drone videographers.

"This is not a hobby anymore. This is a profession," Parker Gyokeres of Propellerheads Aerial Photography tells us. "This is a professional skill set that has taken us years to develop."

Produced by Will Wei. Additional camera by Alana Kakoyiannis and Justin Gmoser



Read more:  http://www.businessinsider.com/beautiful-drone-videos-2014-9#ixzz3Gt6O3LUZ

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Propellerheads is offering an e-learning course on UAV operations in cooperation with the ASMP!

http://asmp.org/e-learning/uav#.VDLIr75sBUQ

Parker Gyokeres

In addition to being the owner, vehicle builder and pilot at Propellerheads, Parker Gyokeres is an active duty U.S. Air Force Photojournalist and the current Chief of Public Affairs for the 621st Contingency Response Wing, Joint Base Mcguire-Dix-Lakehurst, N.J. Gyokeres has 22 years of worldwide expeditionary experience, to include three deployments to Afghanistan and one to Iraq. He has been active in remote control flight for ten years and has extensive experience with the construction and operation of both multicopters and fixed-wing aircraft.

Bird? Plane? No, It’s the Wedding Photographer

Bird? Plane? No, It’s the Wedding Photographer

“Everyone is looking for that one great shot,” said Darcy Miller, the editorial director of Martha Stewart Weddings. Although Ms. Miller has been to more weddings than most people, she admits that she has never seen a drone used at one — so far, anyway. “I’m sure everything changes every day with technology.”

Among photographers and videographers, however, drones and weddings are “a hot topic in the industry now,” said Denis Reggie, an Atlanta-based wedding photographer who decidedly has not bought into this technology. “We’ve seen so much information about drones, but they’re not sanctioned by the F.A.A. yet,” he said.

Brendan Schulman, a lawyer and special counsel at the law firm Kramer Levin in Manhattan, where he is a litigator with a specialty in unmanned aircraft systems, said: “This is the future of technology. It’s not like an airplane with passengers and fuel on board, and there are no safety issues.” Mr. Schulman, who has represented drone pilots in court when they have been challenged by the F.A.A., reports that Hollywood filmmakers had been using model airplanes for decades, and yet the agency had never issued guidelines.

That is until 1981, he said, when it did issue some, including recommending not flying higher than 400 feet or within three miles of an airport. And those were only voluntary, he noted. Then, in 2007, recognizing that businesses were going to be using the machines, the agency put out a “policy statement” about not using model aircraft for “commercial purposes.” But a policy statement is not a law, Mr. Schulman said.

Les Dorr, a spokesman for the F.A.A. disputes Mr. Schulman’s interpretation, saying: “The F.A.A. believes laws and regulations are the same thing. Under the 2012 F.A.A. law, you can fly a model aircraft for hobby or recreational purposes without authorization from the F.A.A. For any other reason, like commercial purposes, you need F.A.A. approval.”

This has sowed confusion among couples and their photographers about using drones at weddings. Nevertheless, the agency and many of the professional photographers who are choosing to add drones to their arsenal of photo gear, like Parker Gyokeres, are on the same page when it comes to safety concerns. Mr. Gyokeres, an active duty United States Air Force photojournalist who was hired as a subcontractor by the Maloney-Florke wedding’s photographer, said, “I always have an abort plan, and I never fly my drone out of my sight.” If he is within five miles of an airport, he contacts the tower and never flies higher than 400 feet.

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Wedding photographers are out, drones are in

According to a trend piece in the New York Times wedding section, camera-equipped drones are increasingly showing up as wedding guests for the rich and famous. Far from uninvited, unmanned aerial copters have emerged as the hot new must-have excess at high profile ceremonies around the world. The whole thing is very très chic, etc.

In June, a drone shot photos from above as Randy Florke and U.S. Rep. Sean Patrick Maloney traded vows on the grounds of their sweeping manor in Cold Spring, N.Y. Among the high-profile guests sharing the spotlight with the unmanned aerial vehicle were House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, Facebook cofounder-turned-publisher Chris Hughes, and an aide to Hillary Clinton.

Maloney, a member of the subcommittee that guides the Federal Aviation Administration admitted that he wasn't aware of restrictions that might apply to his wedding photographer's high-tech stunt. Maloney and Florke commissioned a wedding photographer who subcontracted Propellerheads Aerial Photography, helmed by UAV enthusiast and talented Air Force photojournalist Parker Gyokeres, for the drone shots.

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Lawmaker hired commercial drone for wedding

Members of Congress have been pressing the FAA to move more quickly to integrate commercial drone flights into the national airspace. But FAA officials, who have expressed concern about the safety of drones, have allowed only a very few commercial operations on a case-by-case basis.

The wedding photographer subcontracted Parker Gyokeres of Propellerheads Aerial Photography of Trenton, N.J. to shoot the video. Gyokeres posted outtakes of the wedding on his company's website and created a YouTube video.


Read more: http://www.politico.com/story/2014/07/sean-patrick-maloney-wedding-drone-109025.html#ixzz38UNRJazI

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Family uses drone to help locate missing man

David Lesh owns a ski and snowboard outerwear company based in Colorado. The Colorado resident purchased a drone to film aerial ski and snowboard videos. This weekend, while visiting his girlfriend's family in Fitchburg, he found a new use for his drone that he never expected.

"I never thought that I would be using it to find somebody," Lesh said.

When he heard about 82-year-old Guillermo DeVenecia, who had been missing for three days, he figured he'd step in to help.

"We weren't really sure what we would find or what kind of shape he would be in if we did find him... I don't think any of us expected to find him," Lesh said.

After a three day search with a helicopter, search dogs and hundreds of volunteers, Lesh sent up his drone to look at a 200-acre bean field, from about 200 feet in the air.

"I thought what would happen would be we'd be able to give them the piece of mind to cross of some more areas quickly," said Katie Gorman, Lesh's girlfriend.

In what would have taken volunteers hours to search on foot, in just 20 minutes Lesh had combed through most of the field.

As they headed to the final corner of the field, Lesh noticed a man standing in the middle of it.

"As we were making the last turn to fly it, we noticed a man out in the field sort of stumbling, looking a little disoriented," Lesh said.

Sure enough, that man was DeVenecia. Lesh, Katie and her father, Gary Gorman, carried DeVenecia to their car.

"To be honest, when David was flying the drone over the bean fields, we thought we were looking for a body," said Gary, who was surprised at DeVenecia's condition.

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A Congressmans Drone Disobedience - The Wall Street Journal - 21 July, 2014

Parker Gyokeres

In addition to being the owner, vehicle builder and pilot at Propellerheads, Parker Gyokeres is an active duty U.S. Air Force Photojournalist and the current Chief of Public Affairs for the 621st Contingency Response Wing, Joint Base Mcguire-Dix-Lakehurst, N.J. Gyokeres has 22 years of worldwide expeditionary experience, to include three deployments to Afghanistan and one to Iraq. He has been active in remote control flight for ten years and has extensive experience with the construction and operation of both multicopters and fixed-wing aircraft.

Rep. Sean Patrick Maloney used drone at his wedding — violating Federal Aviation Administration rules

Parker Gyokeres, owner of Propellerheads Aerial Photography, who operated the drone at Maloney's wedding, and was paid by Maloney's videographer, acknowledged in an interview Monday the "FAA has straight banned everyone from flying."

But Gyokeres distinguished between federal law and FAA interpretation.

"There are no laws that prohibit the use of multicopters for photography," he said.

Prior to wedding, the Gyokeres and Maloney briefly discussed the murky legality of drone use and lack of clear federal policy, a source said. Maloney mentioned that he sits on the subcommittee overseeing the FAA but didn't want to discuss policy on his wedding day, according to the source.

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A Congressman Used A Drone To Film An Incredible Wedding Video

Congressman Sean Patrick Maloney (D-New York) had a lavish wedding in June and filmed the affair from a drone.

 

In the drone's video footage, the happy couple - Maloney, the first openly gay congressman from the Empire State, and his longtime partner, Randy Florke - can be seen having rice thrown on them as they exit a church in the upstate town of Cold Spring. The drone then flies higher for a panoramic view of the church and, later, the poolside reception.

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Dem Congressman Produces Most Extravagant Wedding Video of All Time

Dem Congressman Produces Most Extravagant Wedding Video of All Time

The wedding video, shot by Propellerheads Aerial Photography, begins by panning around a massive upstate New York home to a large in-ground swimming pool, nestled in the quiet Hudson River valley. The Temper Trap lays the soundtrack with “Sweet Disposition.” It’s basically a much happier version of The Shining’s opening credits.

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The FAA Is Trying to Ban First-Person View Drone Flights

The FAA Is Trying to Ban First-Person View Drone Flights

the agency is trying to assert that commercial flight of drones is illegal, despite there being no official, legally-enforceable regulations against it—a point that the FAA has already lost in court (an appeal is still pending). It's also trying to make the same tired argument that if a drone is used for a commercial purpose, it ceases being a "model" aircraft and becomes a standard one—the exact same argument a judge threw out just months ago. The document also tries to say that these new rules are already in effect, and have been for roughly two years.

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National Press Club to Host Newsmaker Media Briefing on "Commercial Use of Drones and the FAA: Drawing a Line in the Sand"

WASHINGTON, June 13, 2014 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Brendan Schulman, attorney and leading expert in use of commercial drones who just won the first case ever brought by the FAA on this issue; Ben Gielow,  government relations manager and general counsel for the Association for Unmanned Vehicles Systems International (AUVSI); and Parker Gyokeres, executive member of the Professional Society of Drone Journalists.

/Source

Parker Gyokeres

In addition to being the owner, vehicle builder and pilot at Propellerheads, Parker Gyokeres is an active duty U.S. Air Force Photojournalist and the current Chief of Public Affairs for the 621st Contingency Response Wing, Joint Base Mcguire-Dix-Lakehurst, N.J. Gyokeres has 22 years of worldwide expeditionary experience, to include three deployments to Afghanistan and one to Iraq. He has been active in remote control flight for ten years and has extensive experience with the construction and operation of both multicopters and fixed-wing aircraft.